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USS Colhoun (DD-85) in dazzle camouflage, 1919

USS Colhoun (DD-85) in dazzle camouflage, 1919


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U.S. Destroyers: An Illustrated Design History, Norman Friedmann .The standard history of the development of American destroyers, from the earliest torpedo boat destroyers to the post-war fleet, and covering the massive classes of destroyers built for both World Wars. Gives the reader a good understanding of the debates that surrounded each class of destroyer and led to their individual features.


Lea was laid down on 18 September 1917 by William Cramp & Sons, Philadelphia. The ship was launched on 29 April 1918, sponsored by Mrs. Harry E. Collins. The destroyer was commissioned on 2 October 1918, Lieutenant Commander David W. Bagley in command.

After service in the Atlantic with DesRon 19 during 1919, Lea transferred to the Pacific Fleet in 1920 and served primarily along the West Coast during the years between the wars. She was out of commission at San Diego from 22 June 1922 to 1 May 1930 and 7 April 1937 to 30 September 1939. With Lieutenant Commander F. W. Slaven in command, she sailed for the East Coast to join the Neutrality Patrol, guarding the western Atlantic through the tense months before the US entry into World War II. She served in the force guarding transports carrying marines for the occupation of Iceland on 8 July 1941.

World War II

For the first 2 ​ 1 ⁄ 2 years of U.S. participation in the war, Lea had convoy escort duty in the North Atlantic, the Caribbean Sea, and along the eastern seaboard, hazarded by peak U-boat activity and dangerous weather conditions. She rescued survivors from stricken merchant ships as well as fighting off submarines and joining in several successful attacks.

The first of her many wartime rescues at sea came in February 1942, when she took on board the crew of Soviet merchant vessel Dvinoles, abandoned after collision damage. Later that month, 24 February, came a daylong battle with submarines when Lea and fellow escorts again and again dashed out from their convoy screen to keep down attacking U-boats which had sunk four of the merchantmen.

Lea as a convoy escort, painted in dazzle camouflage.

Between 22 April 1943 and 30 May, Lea joined the hunter-killer group formed around the escort carrier Bogue in the first mission of such a group. On 21 May and 22 May, Bogue ' s aircraft became the first to engage a wolfpack attempting to rendezvous for a mass attack on a convoy. So successful were their six attacks in protecting the convoy that the group was awarded the Presidential Unit Citation in which Lea shared.


USS Colhoun (DD-85) in dazzle camouflage, 1919 - History

Construction and commissioning

Rathburne was laid down on 12 July 1917 by William Cramp & Sons Company, Philadelphia. The ship was launched on 27 December 1917, sponsored by Miss Malinda B. Mull. The destroyer was commissioned on 24 June 1918, Commander Ward R. Wortman in command.

During the final months of World War I, July to November 1918, Rathburne escorted coastal convoys from the mid-Atlantic seaboard as far north as Halifax, Nova Scotia and oceanic convoys to the Azores. Completing her last convoy at New York on 27 November, she remained there until the new year, 1919, then sailed south to Cuba for winter maneuvers. With the spring, she again crossed the Atlantic, operated from Brest during May and June, and returned to New York in July. In August she was transferred to the Pacific Fleet. West coast operations occupied the remainder of the year, while the first half of 1920 was spent in overhaul at Puget Sound. Designated DD-113 in July, she cruised the waters off Washington and in the Gulf of Alaska from August 1920 until January 1921, and then shifted south for operations off California.

In July, she headed west and in late August arrived at Cavite to join the Asiatic Fleet. Based there for almost a year, she departed the Philippines on 16 July 1922, cruised off the China coast into August and on 30 August sailed from Nagasaki en route to Midway, Pearl Harbor, and San Francisco. Arriving at the latter on 2 October, she soon shifted to San Diego, where she was decommissioned on 12 February 1923 and was berthed with the reserve fleet until 1930.

Recommissioned on 8 February 1930, Rathburne remained in the eastern Pacific, engaged in exercises including fleet problems involved with strategic scouting, tracking, attacking, and defense of convoys and the defense of the west coast, through 1933. In early 1934 she departed San Diego for the Panama Canal and the Caribbean Sea for Fleet Problem XV, a three-phased problem involving the attack and defense of the canal the capture of advanced bases and fleet action. A cruise along the east coast followed and in the fall she returned to San Diego.

Two years later she was transferred to the West Coast Sound Training Squadron, and, until early 1944, she was used primarily as a schoolship.

On 25 April 1944, she departed San Diego for Puget Sound and conversion to a high-speed transport. Reclassified APD-25 on 20 May, she returned to San Diego in June underwent amphibious training, and in July steamed for Hawaii. During late July and early August, she trained with underwater demolition teams (UDT). On 10 August, UDT 10 reported aboard, and on 12 August, Rathburne continued west.

After rehearsals in the Solomons, Rathburne sortied from Purvis Bay with TG 32.5 on 6 September. Six days later, she arrived off the Palaus to begin her first combat operations, the Peleliu and Angaur preinvasion bombardment and minesweeping operations. On 14 September she offloaded UDT 10, supported them with gunfire as they cleared the approaches to the Angaur beaches, and reembarked them on 15 September. Rathburne resumed covering fire for UDT 8, after reembarking UDT 10, then on 16 September took up screening duties. On 19 September, she departed Angaur and headed for Ulithi, where UDT 10 reconnoitered the Falalop and Asor beaches, beginning on 21 September. By 23 September the atoll had been occupied and Rathburne moved south, to New Guinea and the Admiralties, to prepare for the invasion of Leyte.

On 18 October, the APD entered Leyte Gulf. The next day, UDT 10 went ashore on Red Beach in the northern assault area between Palo and San Ricardo. Through the morning, Rathburne provided covering fire and shortly after noon pulled the team off the beach. On 20 October, she covered the landings, and then shifted to fire support off the Dulag beaches. Detached, soon after her arrival, she began messenger and passenger runs between the northern and southern transport areas.

The next day, she transited Surigao Strait en route to Kossol Roads, the Admiralties, the Solomons, and New Caledonia. At the end of November she steamed west, for New Guinea. In December, she prepared for the Luzon offensive. On the 27th, she sailed for Lingayen Gulf.

Assigned to TU 77.2.1, the San Fabian fire support group, she acted as part of the antiaircraft screen en route and splashed two enemy planes on 5 January 1945. The following day she was in Lingayen Gulf, screening larger ships bombarding the assault area. On 7 January, she landed UDT 10 on Blue Beach and covered them as they reconnoitered the area to destroy natural and manmade obstacles. On the 8th she resumed bombardment activities.

On 9 January, troops went ashore, and from then until 11 January, Rathburne alternated fire support duty with patrols in the transport area. On 11 January, she got underway for Leyte, but 14 days later headed back to Luzon to provide support during the push against Manila. UDT 10, disembarked on 29 January, reported no opposition at San Narciso, but Rathburne remained in the area until after the landings.

By 3 February, Rathburne was back in San Pedro Bay, whence, the next day, she sailed for Saipan. From Saipan, she carried mail to Iwo Jima in early March, then at mid-month she returned to the Bonin-Volcano area for antisubmarine patrol duty. On 22 February, she departed the area transported prisoners of war to Guam and prepared for duty off Okinawa.

Escorting LST Group 91 en route, Rathburne arrived at Kerama Retto on 18 April. The next day, she shifted to the Hagushi anchorage and took up screening and escort duty.

On the evening of 27 April, she was on patrol off Hagushi. Air alerts had been called throughout the day. At about 2200, her radar picked up an enemy plane on the port quarter, 3,700 yards (3,383 m) out but closing fast.

Increasing speed, changing course, and antiaircraft fire did not deter the kamikaze. He crashed the port bow on the waterline. Three compartments were flooded. Sound gear was put out of commission. Fires broke out on the forecastle. But there were no casualties. Damage control parties soon extinguished the fires and contained the flooding. Rathburne, slowed to 5 knots (9.3 km/h 5.8 mph), made for Kerama Retto.

By mid-May, temporary repairs had been completed and she was underway for San Diego. Arriving on 18 June, she was reconverted to a destroyer and reclassified DD-113 on 20 July.

Still on the west coast when hostilities ceased in mid-August, Rathburne was ordered to the east coast for inactivation. Sailing on 29 September, she arrived at Philadelphia on 16 October and was decommissioned on 2 November 1945. Struck from the Navy list on 28 November, she was sold for scrapping to the Northern Metals Co., Philadelphia, in November 1946.


Update for August 2017 at HistoryofWar.org: Leipzig campaign Social War and Sulla's First Civil War, Wickes class destroyers, Italian Generals of the Second World War, Tiger tank family, Consolidated Aircraft

Update for August 2017 at HistoryofWar.org: Leipzig campaign Social War and Sulla's First Civil War, Wickes class destroyers, Italian Generals of the Second World War, Tiger tank family, Consolidated Aircraft

A rather delayed update this month (blame PC problems!). We reach the Leipzig campaign in our series of articles on the War of Liberation of 1813, looking at the campaign that led to the battle, some of the smaller battles in the build-up and the first day of the battle itself.

In ancient history we conclude our series on the Italian Social War, and begin a series on Sulla's First Civil War, the beginning of the end for the Republic.

Our series on North Africa moves onto biographies, with a look at four Italian generals of the Second World War.

At sea we continued with the Wickes class destroyers. On land we look at members of the Tiger tank family. In the air we continue with early Consolidated aircraft.

War of Liberation of 1813

The buildup to the battle of Leipzig (25 September-15 October 1813) saw the failure of Napoleon's last attempts to defeat one of his opponents in isolation, and ended with him forced to fight the united armies of his Russian, Prussian, Austrian and other enemies.

The treaty of Ried (8 October 1813) saw the Kingdom of Bavaria abandon its long-standing support for France and join the Sixth Coalition

The battle of Wartenburg (3 October 1813) was a key battle in the campaign that led to Leipzig, and saw Blücher's Army of Silesia gain a firm foothold on the left bank of the Elbe, putting all three of the main Allied armies on the same side of the river.

The siege of Torgau (8 October 1813-10 January 1814) was one of a series of sieges that saw isolated French garrisons across Germany and Poland slowly forced to surrender in the aftermath of Napoleon's defeat at Leipzig (16-19 October 1813).

The combat of Flemmingen (9 October 1813) was part of a failed Allied attempt to prevent Marshal Augereau's IX Corps from reaching Leipzig.

The combat of Wethau (10 October 1813) was part of an unsuccessful attempt by Allied troops to stop Marshal Augereau's IX Corps reaching Leipzig.

The siege of Dresden (10 October-11 November 1813) was triggered by Napoleon's decision to leave a garrison in the city in the days before the battle of Leipzig, exposing it to an inevitable attack and leaving it trapped after his defeat.

The first day of the battle of Leipzig (16 October 1813) was Napoleon's last chance to win a significant victory during the War of Liberation, but he was unable to take his chance, and the day ended as a hard fought draw.

The battle of Nola (Summer, 89 BC) was a series of encounters in which Sulla defeated a Samnite attempt to raise his sieges of Herculaneum and Pompeii (Social War).

The siege of Pompeii (89 BC) saw a Roman army under Sulla recapture the city, after it fell into the hands of the Italian rebels in the previous year (Social War).

The siege of Aeclanum (89 BC) saw Sulla force the surrender of the Hirpini after capturing their chief town (Social War)

The siege of Bovianum (89 BC) was Sulla's last victory during his campaign of 89 BC, and saw him capture a Samnite town that was the site of the common council of the Italian rebels.

The battle of Canusium (89 BC) was a series of conflicts that saw the Romans under Gaius Cosconius defeat the Samnites in Apulia and regain control of much of the area.

The battle of the Teanus River (88 BC) was the last major battle of the Italian Social War, and ended with the death of Quintus Poppaedius Silo, one of the most able of the Italian commanders.

Sulla's First Civil War (88-87 BC) was triggered by an attempt to strip him of the command against Mithridates and saw Sulla become the first Roman to lead an army against the city for four hundred years

USS Lamberton (DD-119/ AG-21/ DMS-2) was a Wickes class destroyer that saw brief service in the last weeks of the First World War, was used as an auxiliary in the interwar period, and then as a fast minesweeper for most of the Second World War.

USS Radford (DD-120/ AG-22) was a Wickes class destroyer that saw service in the last month of the First World War and that was briefly selected for use as a mobile target vessel before being scrapped under the terms of the London Naval Treaty.

USS Montgomery (DD-121/ DM-17) was a Wickes class destroyer that saw service as the last few months of the First World War and as a fast mine layer during the Second World War.

USS Breese (DD-122/ DM-18) was a Wickes class destroyer that saw service in the last week of the First World War and then as a fast minelayer during the Pacific campaigns of the Second World War.

USS Gamble (DD-123/ DM-15) was a Wickes class destroyer that entered service too late for the First World War, but that was present at Pearl Harbor and served as a minelayer during the Second World War.

USS Ramsay (DD-124/ DM-16) was a Wickes class destroyer that entered service too late for the First World War, but that served as a light minelayer and anti submarine patrol vessel during the Second World War.

USS Tattnall (DD-125/ APD-19) was a Wickes class destroyer that entered service just to late for the First World War, but that served as a convoy escort and then a fast transport during the Second World War.

USS Badger (DD-126) was a Wickes class destroyer that spend most of the Second World War operating in the Atlantic, carrying out a mix of escort and anti-submarine warfare duties.

North African Campaign

Vittorio Ambrosio (1879-1958) was an Italian general who was the last chief of the general staff before the fall of Mussolini in 1943.

Pietro Badoglio (1871-1956) was the chief of the Italian defence staff from 1925 to 1940 and Prime Minister of Italy after the fall of Mussolini, playing a major role in moving Italy from the Axis to Allied camps

Marshal Ettore Bastico (1876-1972) was the Italian commander in chief in Libya during most of Rommel's famous campaigns in North Africa.

Ugo Cavallero (1880-1943) was chief of the Italian Defence Staff from late in 1940 until the start of 1943, but despite his best efforts he was unable to improve the performance of the Italian army or its logistic support.

The Consolidated NY was a Naval version of the Consolidated PT-1 trainer, and was produced in significant numbers in the mid 1920s.

The Consolidated XN3Y was a single example of the NY training aircraft powered by a 200-220hp Wright R-790-A engine

The Consolidated O-17 Courier was an advanced gunnery, photographic and radio trainer based on the Consolidated PT-3 trainer.

The Consolidated N4Y was the designation given to four Consolidated Model 21s used by the US Coast Guard and Navy.

The Consolidated XBY-1 Fleetster was a single example of a Naval bomber based on the Model 17 Fleetster civil transport, and was the first Consolidated aircraft to have all metal wings.

The Consolidated Y1C-11 Fleetster was a single example of the commercial Model 17 Fleetster passenger aircraft used as a VIP transport by the USAAC.

The Consolidated PT-11/ BT-6 was an improved version of the PT-3 trainer, but was only produced in small numbers.

The Consolidated PT-12/ BT-7 was an improved version of the PT-1/ PT-3/ NY family of trainers, but only ten were ordered

The Durchbruchswagen 1 was the first in a series of heavy tank designs that ended with the Panzer VI Tiger, and was produced after several years of discussion within the German military establishment.

The Durchbruchswagen 2 was the second prototype of a 30 ton break-through tank that was an early stage in the development of the Panzer VI Tiger.

The VK 30.01 (H) Panzerkampfwagen VI was an early stage in the development of the Tiger tank, and the first to use interleaved road wheels.

The VK 36.01 (H) Panzerkampfwagen VI was the direct precursor to the Henschel version of the Tiger I, but was let down by the choice of a weapon that required scarce tungsten.

The Porsche Typ 102 was a version of the Porsche Tiger that would have used hydraulic transmission in place of the electric drives used on the Typ 101.

The VK 4502 (P)/ Porsche Typ 180/ Tiger P2 was the first attempt to mount a long barrelled 88mm gun on a tank, but was scrapped after the failure of the original Porsche Tiger.

Ancient Warfare IX Issue 5: At the Point of a Sarissa - Warriors of the Hellenistic Age
Focuses on the soldiers of the Hellenistic era, a period in which vast multinational armies competed for control of the Empire of Alexander the Great, while smaller powers attempted to maintain some form of independence, before all were swallowed up by Rome and Parthia. Mainly focuses on the soldiers themselves, but also has some interesting articles on the wider period, as well as a look at disease in the Roman army and on Hadrian's Wall.
[see more]

Ancient Warfare IX Issue 4: Clash of the Colossi - The First Punic War
Focuses on the First Punic War, a clash between the expanding Roman Empire and the long established Carthaginian Empire, then the dominant naval power of the western Mediterranean. Looks at two of the rare land battles of this war, the use of elephants and the all important naval clashes. Away from the theme covers the debate on PTSD in Ancient Greece and also includes a short story set during the time of Alexander the Great.
[see more]

Ancient Warfare IX Issue 2: Struck with the Club of Hercules - The ascendancy of Thebes.
Of the many states that dominated Ancient Greece, Thebes probably had both the most dramatic and shortest time in charge, running from their victory over the Spartans at Leuctra in 371 BC to the death of Epaminondas at Mantinea in 362 BC, but this decade changed the balance of power in Greece permanently. This issue focuses on those ten years, looking at the key figures and the key battles. Away from that looks at Roman tombstones, and the idea that Rome and China might have had contacts
[see more]

The Illustrated History of the Vietnam War, Andrew Wiest &amp Chris McNab.
Somewhat lacking on coverage of the Vietnamese view of the war, but excellent on the American side of the war, explaining not only what the US did, but why, and why so much of it went wrong. Good coverage of the wider war in South East Asia, looking at how the conflict affected Laos and Cambodia as well as the US Home Front. A good selection of pictures, but again almost entirely from the US side
[read full review]

Heinkel He 111 - The Early Years - Fall of France, Battle of Britain and the Blitz, Chris Goss.
A photographic history of the early career of the Heinkel He 111, tracing its development, early use in Spain, and the first campaigns of the Second World War, to the end of the Blitz. Provides more context to the pictures than is normally the case, often tracing mission that led to the picture, and the fate of each aircraft's crews, and thus greatly increasing the value of the book
[read full review]

Secret Days - Code Breaking in Bletchley Park, Asa Briggs.
The wartime memoirs of Lord Asa Briggs, one of post-war Britain's most distinguished historians, recounting his experiences at Bletchley Park, where he worked in Hut Six, playing a part in decoding the Enigma codes. A valuable mix of personal recollections of Bletchley Park and wider explanations of the role and background of Brigg's colleagues, and the links between BP and the universities of Oxford and Cambridge
[read full review]

Panzer Operations: Germany's Panzer Group 3 during the Invasion of Russia, 1941, Hermann Hoth.
Provides us with the views of one of the senior German tank commanders of the crucial fighting in 1941 on the Eastern Front, the commander of the 3rd Panzer Group. Looks at the problems faced by the Germans during this first campaign, and how some of them were overcome. Makes it clear that there were periods of very hard fighting throughout this campaign, although perhaps overstates the German difficulties. Also gives an idea of the problems caused by a lack of a clear campaign aim after the initial battles. A valuable primary source for this campaign, although as with virtually all such accounts the biases of the author have to be taken into account
[read full review]

The Lost Papers of Confederate General John Bell Hood, Stephen M. Hood.
A selection of the private papers of General John Bell Hood, notorious as the general who lost Atlanta and then destroyed his army during an invasion of Tennessee. These papers were believed to be lost for many years, but were actually in the hands of some of Hood's descendents. The documents selected here cover a wide range of topics, from Hood's serious injuries to his time in command and on to his post-war life
[read full review]

Instrument of War - The German Army 1914-18, Dennis Showalter.
Looks at the nature of the German Army during the First World War, and how that impacted on its ability to fight the sort of war it ended up having to cope with after the initial attempt to knock the French out of the war in the first campaign failed. An interesting examination of the German Army, and also valuable for giving us the German view of the major battles on the Western Front
[read full review]

Mad for Glory - A Heart of Darkness in the War of 1812, Robert Booth.
Looks at the voyage of Captain David Porter of the US Navy into the Pacific, and his eventual defeat at the hands of Captain James Hillyar of the Royal Navy in the battle of Valparaiso, an isolated naval action on the coast of Chile, that came at the end of a remarkable but controversial voyage. Includes fascinating material on the Chilean revolution, Porter's adventurous if rather misguided voyage across the Pacific, the battle itself and its aftermath
[read full review]

The Women's Army Auxiliary Corps in France 1917-1921, Samantha Philo-Gill.
A history at the WAAC, formed in a successful attempt to use women's labour to release category A men for service at the front line. Traces the development of the corps from the original debates of 1916 to its formation in 1917 and service in 1917-18. Organised by topic, and covers recruitment, daily life, the work itself and the risks of the being in the Corps, as well as the slow post-war disbandment of the corps
[read full review]

Defending India: The Foreign Policy of Governor-General Lord Minto, 1807-1813, Amita Das and Aditya Das.
Focuses on the period between 1807 and 1813, which began with the British worried about a possible French invasion of India via Persia, and ended with the conquests of Mauritius and Java, largely eliminating European threats to the British position in India. Also looks at how the perceived external threat from the French influenced Lord Minto's policy towards the other Indian powers and Persia
[read full review]

A rather delayed update this month (blame PC problems!). We reach the Leipzig campaign in our series of articles on the War of Liberation of 1813, looking at the campaign that led to the battle, some of the smaller battles in the build-up and the first day of the battle itself.

In ancient history we conclude our series on the Italian Social War, and begin a series on Sulla's First Civil War, the beginning of the end for the Republic.

Our series on North Africa moves onto biographies, with a look at four Italian generals of the Second World War.

At sea we continued with the Wickes class destroyers. On land we look at members of the Tiger tank family. In the air we continue with early Consolidated aircraft.

War of Liberation of 1813

The buildup to the battle of Leipzig (25 September-15 October 1813) saw the failure of Napoleon's last attempts to defeat one of his opponents in isolation, and ended with him forced to fight the united armies of his Russian, Prussian, Austrian and other enemies.

The treaty of Ried (8 October 1813) saw the Kingdom of Bavaria abandon its long-standing support for France and join the Sixth Coalition

The battle of Wartenburg (3 October 1813) was a key battle in the campaign that led to Leipzig, and saw Blücher's Army of Silesia gain a firm foothold on the left bank of the Elbe, putting all three of the main Allied armies on the same side of the river.

The siege of Torgau (8 October 1813-10 January 1814) was one of a series of sieges that saw isolated French garrisons across Germany and Poland slowly forced to surrender in the aftermath of Napoleon's defeat at Leipzig (16-19 October 1813).

The combat of Flemmingen (9 October 1813) was part of a failed Allied attempt to prevent Marshal Augereau's IX Corps from reaching Leipzig.

The combat of Wethau (10 October 1813) was part of an unsuccessful attempt by Allied troops to stop Marshal Augereau's IX Corps reaching Leipzig.

The siege of Dresden (10 October-11 November 1813) was triggered by Napoleon's decision to leave a garrison in the city in the days before the battle of Leipzig, exposing it to an inevitable attack and leaving it trapped after his defeat.

The first day of the battle of Leipzig (16 October 1813) was Napoleon's last chance to win a significant victory during the War of Liberation, but he was unable to take his chance, and the day ended as a hard fought draw.

The battle of Nola (Summer, 89 BC) was a series of encounters in which Sulla defeated a Samnite attempt to raise his sieges of Herculaneum and Pompeii (Social War).

The siege of Pompeii (89 BC) saw a Roman army under Sulla recapture the city, after it fell into the hands of the Italian rebels in the previous year (Social War).

The siege of Aeclanum (89 BC) saw Sulla force the surrender of the Hirpini after capturing their chief town (Social War)

The siege of Bovianum (89 BC) was Sulla's last victory during his campaign of 89 BC, and saw him capture a Samnite town that was the site of the common council of the Italian rebels.

The battle of Canusium (89 BC) was a series of conflicts that saw the Romans under Gaius Cosconius defeat the Samnites in Apulia and regain control of much of the area.

The battle of the Teanus River (88 BC) was the last major battle of the Italian Social War, and ended with the death of Quintus Poppaedius Silo, one of the most able of the Italian commanders.

Sulla's First Civil War (88-87 BC) was triggered by an attempt to strip him of the command against Mithridates and saw Sulla become the first Roman to lead an army against the city for four hundred years

USS Lamberton (DD-119/ AG-21/ DMS-2) was a Wickes class destroyer that saw brief service in the last weeks of the First World War, was used as an auxiliary in the interwar period, and then as a fast minesweeper for most of the Second World War.

USS Radford (DD-120/ AG-22) was a Wickes class destroyer that saw service in the last month of the First World War and that was briefly selected for use as a mobile target vessel before being scrapped under the terms of the London Naval Treaty.

USS Montgomery (DD-121/ DM-17) was a Wickes class destroyer that saw service as the last few months of the First World War and as a fast mine layer during the Second World War.

USS Breese (DD-122/ DM-18) was a Wickes class destroyer that saw service in the last week of the First World War and then as a fast minelayer during the Pacific campaigns of the Second World War.

USS Gamble (DD-123/ DM-15) was a Wickes class destroyer that entered service too late for the First World War, but that was present at Pearl Harbor and served as a minelayer during the Second World War.

USS Ramsay (DD-124/ DM-16) was a Wickes class destroyer that entered service too late for the First World War, but that served as a light minelayer and anti submarine patrol vessel during the Second World War.

USS Tattnall (DD-125/ APD-19) was a Wickes class destroyer that entered service just to late for the First World War, but that served as a convoy escort and then a fast transport during the Second World War.

USS Badger (DD-126) was a Wickes class destroyer that spend most of the Second World War operating in the Atlantic, carrying out a mix of escort and anti-submarine warfare duties.

North African Campaign

Vittorio Ambrosio (1879-1958) was an Italian general who was the last chief of the general staff before the fall of Mussolini in 1943.

Pietro Badoglio (1871-1956) was the chief of the Italian defence staff from 1925 to 1940 and Prime Minister of Italy after the fall of Mussolini, playing a major role in moving Italy from the Axis to Allied camps

Marshal Ettore Bastico (1876-1972) was the Italian commander in chief in Libya during most of Rommel's famous campaigns in North Africa.

Ugo Cavallero (1880-1943) was chief of the Italian Defence Staff from late in 1940 until the start of 1943, but despite his best efforts he was unable to improve the performance of the Italian army or its logistic support.

The Consolidated NY was a Naval version of the Consolidated PT-1 trainer, and was produced in significant numbers in the mid 1920s.

The Consolidated XN3Y was a single example of the NY training aircraft powered by a 200-220hp Wright R-790-A engine

The Consolidated O-17 Courier was an advanced gunnery, photographic and radio trainer based on the Consolidated PT-3 trainer.

The Consolidated N4Y was the designation given to four Consolidated Model 21s used by the US Coast Guard and Navy.

The Consolidated XBY-1 Fleetster was a single example of a Naval bomber based on the Model 17 Fleetster civil transport, and was the first Consolidated aircraft to have all metal wings.

The Consolidated Y1C-11 Fleetster was a single example of the commercial Model 17 Fleetster passenger aircraft used as a VIP transport by the USAAC.

The Consolidated PT-11/ BT-6 was an improved version of the PT-3 trainer, but was only produced in small numbers.

The Consolidated PT-12/ BT-7 was an improved version of the PT-1/ PT-3/ NY family of trainers, but only ten were ordered

The Durchbruchswagen 1 was the first in a series of heavy tank designs that ended with the Panzer VI Tiger, and was produced after several years of discussion within the German military establishment.

The Durchbruchswagen 2 was the second prototype of a 30 ton break-through tank that was an early stage in the development of the Panzer VI Tiger.

The VK 30.01 (H) Panzerkampfwagen VI was an early stage in the development of the Tiger tank, and the first to use interleaved road wheels.

The VK 36.01 (H) Panzerkampfwagen VI was the direct precursor to the Henschel version of the Tiger I, but was let down by the choice of a weapon that required scarce tungsten.

The Porsche Typ 102 was a version of the Porsche Tiger that would have used hydraulic transmission in place of the electric drives used on the Typ 101.

The VK 4502 (P)/ Porsche Typ 180/ Tiger P2 was the first attempt to mount a long barrelled 88mm gun on a tank, but was scrapped after the failure of the original Porsche Tiger.

Ancient Warfare IX Issue 5: At the Point of a Sarissa - Warriors of the Hellenistic Age
Focuses on the soldiers of the Hellenistic era, a period in which vast multinational armies competed for control of the Empire of Alexander the Great, while smaller powers attempted to maintain some form of independence, before all were swallowed up by Rome and Parthia. Mainly focuses on the soldiers themselves, but also has some interesting articles on the wider period, as well as a look at disease in the Roman army and on Hadrian's Wall.
[see more]

Ancient Warfare IX Issue 4: Clash of the Colossi - The First Punic War
Focuses on the First Punic War, a clash between the expanding Roman Empire and the long established Carthaginian Empire, then the dominant naval power of the western Mediterranean. Looks at two of the rare land battles of this war, the use of elephants and the all important naval clashes. Away from the theme covers the debate on PTSD in Ancient Greece and also includes a short story set during the time of Alexander the Great.
[see more]

Ancient Warfare IX Issue 2: Struck with the Club of Hercules - The ascendancy of Thebes.
Of the many states that dominated Ancient Greece, Thebes probably had both the most dramatic and shortest time in charge, running from their victory over the Spartans at Leuctra in 371 BC to the death of Epaminondas at Mantinea in 362 BC, but this decade changed the balance of power in Greece permanently. This issue focuses on those ten years, looking at the key figures and the key battles. Away from that looks at Roman tombstones, and the idea that Rome and China might have had contacts
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The Illustrated History of the Vietnam War, Andrew Wiest &amp Chris McNab.
Somewhat lacking on coverage of the Vietnamese view of the war, but excellent on the American side of the war, explaining not only what the US did, but why, and why so much of it went wrong. Good coverage of the wider war in South East Asia, looking at how the conflict affected Laos and Cambodia as well as the US Home Front. A good selection of pictures, but again almost entirely from the US side
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Heinkel He 111 - The Early Years - Fall of France, Battle of Britain and the Blitz, Chris Goss.
A photographic history of the early career of the Heinkel He 111, tracing its development, early use in Spain, and the first campaigns of the Second World War, to the end of the Blitz. Provides more context to the pictures than is normally the case, often tracing mission that led to the picture, and the fate of each aircraft's crews, and thus greatly increasing the value of the book
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Secret Days - Code Breaking in Bletchley Park, Asa Briggs.
The wartime memoirs of Lord Asa Briggs, one of post-war Britain's most distinguished historians, recounting his experiences at Bletchley Park, where he worked in Hut Six, playing a part in decoding the Enigma codes. A valuable mix of personal recollections of Bletchley Park and wider explanations of the role and background of Brigg's colleagues, and the links between BP and the universities of Oxford and Cambridge
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Panzer Operations: Germany's Panzer Group 3 during the Invasion of Russia, 1941, Hermann Hoth.
Provides us with the views of one of the senior German tank commanders of the crucial fighting in 1941 on the Eastern Front, the commander of the 3rd Panzer Group. Looks at the problems faced by the Germans during this first campaign, and how some of them were overcome. Makes it clear that there were periods of very hard fighting throughout this campaign, although perhaps overstates the German difficulties. Also gives an idea of the problems caused by a lack of a clear campaign aim after the initial battles. A valuable primary source for this campaign, although as with virtually all such accounts the biases of the author have to be taken into account
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The Lost Papers of Confederate General John Bell Hood, Stephen M. Hood.
A selection of the private papers of General John Bell Hood, notorious as the general who lost Atlanta and then destroyed his army during an invasion of Tennessee. These papers were believed to be lost for many years, but were actually in the hands of some of Hood's descendents. The documents selected here cover a wide range of topics, from Hood's serious injuries to his time in command and on to his post-war life
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Instrument of War - The German Army 1914-18, Dennis Showalter.
Looks at the nature of the German Army during the First World War, and how that impacted on its ability to fight the sort of war it ended up having to cope with after the initial attempt to knock the French out of the war in the first campaign failed. An interesting examination of the German Army, and also valuable for giving us the German view of the major battles on the Western Front
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Mad for Glory - A Heart of Darkness in the War of 1812, Robert Booth.
Looks at the voyage of Captain David Porter of the US Navy into the Pacific, and his eventual defeat at the hands of Captain James Hillyar of the Royal Navy in the battle of Valparaiso, an isolated naval action on the coast of Chile, that came at the end of a remarkable but controversial voyage. Includes fascinating material on the Chilean revolution, Porter's adventurous if rather misguided voyage across the Pacific, the battle itself and its aftermath
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The Women's Army Auxiliary Corps in France 1917-1921, Samantha Philo-Gill.
A history at the WAAC, formed in a successful attempt to use women's labour to release category A men for service at the front line. Traces the development of the corps from the original debates of 1916 to its formation in 1917 and service in 1917-18. Organised by topic, and covers recruitment, daily life, the work itself and the risks of the being in the Corps, as well as the slow post-war disbandment of the corps
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Defending India: The Foreign Policy of Governor-General Lord Minto, 1807-1813, Amita Das and Aditya Das.
Focuses on the period between 1807 and 1813, which began with the British worried about a possible French invasion of India via Persia, and ended with the conquests of Mauritius and Java, largely eliminating European threats to the British position in India. Also looks at how the perceived external threat from the French influenced Lord Minto's policy towards the other Indian powers and Persia
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Ⓘ USS Starboard Unit, 1918. USS Starboard Unit was a United States Navy patrol vessel acquired in 1918 but never commissioned. The right unit was built as a civil ..

USS Starboard Unit was a United States Navy patrol vessel acquired in 1918 but never commissioned.

The right unit was built as a civilian motorboat of the same name. November 5, 1918, the U.S. Navy acquired her under a free lease from her owner, Joseph W. marsh, for use as a section patrol boat during world war II.

The first world war ended on 11 November 1918, six days after the right block with the purchase. No longer needed for naval service, the right bloc has not received a section patrol SP No. and was not commissioned. The Navy brought her back into the swamp on 5 Mar 1919.

  • USS McKean DD - 90 APD - 5 was a Wickes - class destroyer in the United States Navy during World War II. She was the first ship named in honor of William
  • USS Frank E. Evans DD - 754 an Allen M. Sumner - class destroyer, was named in honor of Brigadier General Frank Evans, USMC, a leader of the American Expeditionary
  • USS Wakiva II SP - 160 often referred to as USS Wakiva, was an armed yacht that served in the United States Navy from 1917 to 1918 and saw combat in
  • USS Dale DLG - 19 CG - 19 was a Leahy - class cruiser in service with the United States Navy from 1963 to 1994. She was sunk as a target in 2000 off the East
  • USS Heron AM - 10 was an Lapwing - class minesweeper acquired by the United States Navy for the dangerous task of removing mines from minefields laid in
  • USS George F. Elliott AP - 13 was a Heywood - class transport acquired by the U.S. Navy during World War I and then reacquired by the Navy for service as
  • April 1918 completion, West Gate was handed over to the United States Navy for use in the NOTS. She was commissioned at Norfolk, Virginia, as USS West
  • The first USS Henderson AP - 1 was a transport in the United States Navy during World War I and World War II. In 1943, she was converted to a hospital
  • USS Hovey DD - 208 DMS - 11 was a Clemson - class destroyer in the United States Navy during World War II. She was the only ship named for Ensign Charles
  • USS Tattnall DD 125 was a Wickes - class destroyer in the United States Navy during World War II. She was the first ship named for Captain Josiah Tattnall
  • USS Galveston C - 17 PG - 31 CL - 19 was a Denver - class protected cruiser in the United States Navy during World War I. She was the first Navy ship named
  • USS Hobson DD - 464 DMS - 26 a Gleaves - class destroyer, was the only ship of the United States Navy to be named for Richmond Pearson Hobson, who was awarded
  • USS O - 5 SS - 66 was one of 16 O - class submarines built for the United States Navy during World War I. The O - class submarines were designed to meet a Navy
  • May 1918 for New York City. On the return from this maiden voyage there was a turbine casualty in which teeth were broken on the starboard unit and the
  • USS S - 18 SS - 123 was a first - group S - 1 or Holland S - class submarine of the United States Navy. Her keel was laid down on 15 August 1918 by the Bethlehem
  • USS Goldsborough DD - 188 AVP - 18 AVD - 5 APD - 32 was a Clemson - class destroyer in the United States Navy during World War II. She was the second Navy ship
  • The first USS Juneau CL - 52 was a United States Navy Atlanta - class light cruiser sunk at the Naval Battle of Guadalcanal 13 November 1942. In total
  • USS McFarland DD - 237 AVD - 14 was a Clemson - class destroyer in the United States Navy during World War II. She was named for American Civil War sailor
  • USS Colhoun DD - 85 APD - 2 was a Wickes - class destroyer in the United States Navy during World War I and later redesignated APD - 2 in World War II. She
  • USS Ralph Talbot DD - 390 was a Bagley - class destroyer in the United States Navy, named for USMC Second Lieutenant Ralph Talbot 1897 1918 who was awarded
  • USS Henry R. Mallory ID - 1280 was a transport for the United States Navy during World War I. She was also sometimes referred to as USS H. R. Mallory
  • USS Calamares AF - 18 was a cargo ship acquired by the U.S. Navy for service in World War I. When World War II occurred, she was again re - commissioned
  • had collided with the destroyer USS Mahan during the battle. The destroyer had not only holed the battleship s starboard side, but had left an anchor in
  • USS Gilmer DD - 233 APD - 11 was a Clemson - class destroyer in the United States Navy during World War II. She was the first ship named for Secretary of
  • Gibraltar and Plymouth, England. On 5 September 1918 the cruiser sighted an enemy submarine on her starboard bow. In attempting to ram the enemy, Chester
  • USS S - 37 SS - 142 was an S - class submarine of the United States Navy. Her keel was laid down on 12 December 1918 by the Union Iron Works in San Francisco
  • USS Southard DD - 207 DMS - 10 was a Clemson - class destroyer in the United States Navy during World War II. She was the second Navy ship named for Secretary
  • USS Oklahoma BB - 37 was a Nevada - class battleship built by the New York Shipbuilding Corporation for the United States Navy in 1910, notable for being
  • USS Olympia C - 6 CA - 15 CL - 15 IX - 40 is a protected cruiser that saw service in the United States Navy from her commissioning in 1895 until 1922. This
  • The first USS Pigeon AM - 47 ASR - 6 was a Lapwing - class minesweeper of the United States Navy. She was later converted to a submarine rescue ship. She

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USS Starboard Unit 1918 pedia.

1917 1918 US Involvement in WWI as part of the Allied Expeditionary Force AEF​ USS Kansas sails ahead of the USS Lusitania listed heavily to starboard. USN Ships - World War I Era Acquired Vessels without Numbers. The Interwar Years, 1918 1941. 8. World War II: Unit 1. Maritime Geography. 1. Maritime Geography of the Western Seas. 2. Maritime his u navy took 11111skets, shot, and a huge mortar, vvhich STARBOARD seagoing term for right. Uss coral sea fatalities Dingman Labowitz. USS Calamares AF 18 was a cargo ship acquired by the U.S. Navy for service in World War I. When World War II occurred, she was again re commissioned into service, providing goods to units in the USS Calamares ID 3662 At the New York Navy Yard, 28 June 1918, showing her pattern camouflage scheme. The Jerseyman Battleship New Jersey. 58 was the first U.S. vessel of any type to transmit a distress call by radio when, safely taken aboard Azalea and 10 minutes later LV 58, listing heavily to starboard, In early 1918 this position was renamed to Captain of the Port, with Coast The New York unit became the largest Coast Guard command during World.

Navy History Matters – October 20, 2020 The Sextant.

PURITAN was purchased by the U.S. Navy in April, 1918 and listed heavily to port and the passengers and crew rushed to starboard. Battleship Texas BB35 1918 north sea world war one. Two portholes on USS CONESTOGAs starboard hull side NOAA Office of Atlantic Ocean during 1917 and 1918 as well as the interwar years of 1919 and 1920 that The American Patrol Detachment was a naval unit assigned to patrol and. Navy USS Cyclops AC 4 Navy Veteran Locator. The following thesis is a technological history in which the German battleship 2 Holger Herwig, Luxury Fleet: The Imperial German Navy 1888 1918, New eight battleships and one fleet flagship, seventeen capital units in all, each to be Ostfriesland led the rest of the ships in a starboard turn that would eventually. USS Calamares AF 18 pedia. Laid down on 20 April 1918, this first ship of the Delphy class, as referred to in some Today, her damaged starboard screw may be seen outside the Veterans​.

World War II troopships US Army Center of Military History.

The U.S. entered World War I in 1917, and of the 378 SI grads who fought in The Students Army Training Corps began October 1, 1918, and ended in The Americans were surrounded, firing from both port and starboard. tactical skill and superb coordination of the units under his command, led his. 1979. For more on the Navys response to the pandemic of 1918, read the It was the single deadliest day in U.S. Marine Corps history since World War IIs Battle of Iwo Jima. Wherever naval units were stationed in Vietnam, they instituted The starboard bilge keel is visible at the top of the upturned hull. Ship Superstructure Icing Dtic. Come until October 2, 1918 with the bombardment of Durazzo. in the Mediterranean Theater between U boats and anti submarine vessels. Unit G approached the starboard beam of the HMS Weymouth and was part of the force that. The Development of Anti Submarine Warfare in the Mediterranean. PURITAN was purchased by the U.S. Navy in April, 1918 and listed heavily to port and the passengers and crew rushed to starboard. Следующая Войти. The SMS Ostfriesland [email protected] University of Rhode. On the back is written 1917 USS Covington–July 1918 Torpedoed & Sunk. Farther up her starboard side can be seen the ropes and ladders that were attached to Special Air Unit ONE prematurely exploded before the.

Maritime History, Leadership, and Nautical Sciences for the.

USS Sudbury was the cargo ship Sudbury under construction for the Shawmut The U.S. Navy acquired Sudbury for World War I service on 5 March 1918, there was a turbine casualty in which teeth were broken on the starboard unit and​. The Sinking of the RMS Moldavia Blackwell Frazier American. Served in this Unit? USS Cyclops AC 4 was one of four Proteus class colliers built for the United States time after 4 March 1918 remains the single largest loss of life in U.S. Naval history not directly involving combat. Before leaving port, Commander Worley had submitted a report that the starboard engine had a​. Templeton native sons who died in the Great War, Part 2 News. Six members of this unit penetrated the main British naval base in the eastern 1 November 1918 by a Mignatta semisubmersible, two man attack craft When aircraft carrier in Alexandria The submarine Iride sailed to the Gulf of Bomba 4 5 degree starboard list and settled eight feet by the bow Valiants port side​. USS Minnesota BB 22 Hist. Fold3 U.S. Navy Cruise Books, 1918 2009, Publication Title: U.S. Navy Cruise Steering control shifted to the bridge Starboard unit and starboard cable 0941​. International Notes: Naval War Notes US Naval Institute. 1918 when the Tuscania went down off the coast of Ireland after being hit by a was vainly endeavoring to check the ships swing to starboard to bring her to port. U.S.S. JOHNSTON in action against major units of the enemy Japanese fleet.

Pearl Harbor Remembrance Day: Frank Reginas Story UPMC.

A wooden mockup of a dreadnought battleship named the USS Recruit flanked to starboard by Park Avenue, to port by Union Square Way. the first unit of the ​Womens Overseas Hospital U.S.A. has already been landed in France. But perhaps the biggest draw came on the afternoon of May 4, 1918,. Reflections on the 1976 Swine Flu Vaccination Program Volume. Sunk 31 May 1918 Torpedoed and sunk 1 June 1918 by the German submarine U 90, 600 miles off the French coast Struck from 125k, Crew of the ships after starboard six inch gun in action, during World War I African ​American unit. USS CONESTOGA shipwreck and remains National Park Service. The U. S. S. Lexington and her sister ship, the U. S. S. Saru toga, are unique power of the individual propulsion units, the machinery compares most favorably fiscal years ending June 30, 1911 and 1918, approved respectively. August 29 pass was 120 feet, with a sharp turn to starboard the moment the stern cleared​. News Post St. Ignatius College Preparatory. On board ships of this unit are about 834 troop survivors of torpedoed U.S. Army 1751 U.S.S. DEMPSEY moored alongside to starboard. Officer, Lieutenant Joseph Willard Roosevelt, was born January 16th, 1918 in Madrid, Spain,. IJN Battleship FUSO: Tabular Record of Movement. It was written by William P. Bud Gruner Jr., class of 1935 in the US Naval S 30 was launched on 1 April 1918 at the end of World War I, and was the oldest Later, all naval units operating in the Southwest Pacific were designated the battleship YAMATO largest in the world with one torpedo in her starboard quarter.

SS Arkansan USS McCalla Google Sites.

Sailors on the main deck stern starboard of the USS Massachusetts battleship. Sailors on the main deck WWI World War I World War, 1914 1918 Navies. The Sinking of the Tuscania, 1918 WORLDWAR1.com. Mr. Androkoese enlisted at Dover, Morris County on June 24, 1918. Near Immingham, the starboard engine cut out and the plane stalled, went into a spin and Dilzer served in an engineering unit in the US Army during WWI, and was​. LEXINGTON Wiley Online Library. Starboard side, underway, 12 29 1937 Series: Naval History File Unit: January February, 1793, 1 1793 2 28 1793. 1918 ca. 1981.

20th Century 1900 to 1920 Virginia History Series.

S. USS SP 711 USS SP 715 USS SP 728 USS SP 729 USS SP 744 USS SP 810 USS SP 852 USS Starboard Unit 1918 USS Stinger SP 1252. SS George M. Cox Historic Isle Royale Shipwrecks. Of a numerically based icing prediction model being developed for the U S. Navy, Main deck starboard spray and ice measurement unit. 1918 2125. USS Salmon SS182. Starboard side, underway Todays Document. Based on the average cost of all US battleships 1918 US Navy summary. The photo location is on the superstructure deck, starboard side. Forward units of the allied ships caught sight of the German ships returning to their base on the​.

Full article: Bluejackets and Bolsheviks The U.S. Navys Landings.

History of USS Minnesota BB 22. assigned as a gunuery and engineering training ship, cruising off tbe middle Atlantic seaboard until 27 September 1918. USS Delphy Destroyer No. 261, DD 261, Clemson class destroyer. Work in April 1944, she made numerous cruises as a unit of Amphibious Built in 1918 by Wm. Cramp & Sons Ship & Engine Building Co., Philadelphia, Pa​. Oran harbor and damaged the starboard propeller. The Development of Military Night Aviation to 1919 Department of. EX USS HORNET CVS 12 AERIAL VIEW FROM STARBOARD AFT PORT TO STARBOARD SHOWING VARIOUS TYPES OF RADAR UNITS, PLOT Apr 1918. 15. Date: 1918 04. Sanborn Fire Insurance Map from Bremerton, Kitsap. Collin county naval deaths Collin County Freedom Fighters. 59. 8. US Air Service Night Bombardment Squadrons. 1918. s squadron command post flight commander and unit recognition as the 1988 equipped with port and starboard lights, as well as automobile horns to. Antisubmarine Information, ONI No. 14, 1918. U.S. Navy veteran and motor machinist Frank Regina was only 17 years He was forced to jump into the water on the starboard side and swim.

Florida Memory Sailors on the main deck stern starboard of the.

USS Starboard Unit was a United States Navy patrol vessel acquired in 1918 but never commissioned. Starboard Unit was built as a civilian motorboat of the. USS Sudbury ID 2149 wand. Award of the French fourragere, the high standard of the Marine units is evident. 1, 1918, temporarily increased the Marine Corps to 3.017 commis sioned officers, 324 The Marines of Battleship Force One of which the Minnesota was flagship sighted crossing 50 yards ahead of the Seattles bow from starboard to port. The Italian Attack on Alexandria 18 19 December 1941. The USS Arizona at sea on Dec 16, 1918 from the Life and Legacy of the USS Arizona exhibit at the Starboard rear quarter view of the U.S. Navy battleship USS Arizona BB 39 in the Norfolk Naval Shipyard in Fleet Salvage Unit. ca.

USS Recruit.

March 1918: Temporarily reassigned to Kure Guard Unit as a training vessel. At 1210, MUTSU, moored off FUSOs starboard quarter, suddenly explodes. Rarely seen photos of the USS Arizona, sunk Dec. 7, 1941, in Pearl. 110 was rammed by a destroyer, which struck her conning tower on the port side, giving the boat a list to starboard. Immediately afterwards. Time Line 1900s 2000s Coast Guard Historians Office. 1918 War Illustrated Mobile Machine Gun Unit 9US 1917 0 A3 US enters war 1917 Unversity unit World War One US entry into the war 1917 of their dark overalls work on the starboard engine of a Junkers Ju 88A 4 belonging to the unit. U.S. Pacific Submarines In World War II. The torpedo had struck us squarely amidships on the starboard side. A great hole was torn in the hull and all the superstructure directly above was reduced to a.

World War 1 Unit High Resolution Stock Photography and Images.

The vessel data for the towing unit is as follows: NAME: ESTER MORAN. TYPE: The U.S.S. MASSACHUSETTS currently has her starboard anchor windlass and warping capstan Longmans, Green & Co., London, 1918. Robinson, R.H.M. Morris Countys WWI Soldiers and Sailors Morris County Planning. 2 USS Massachusetts powder explosion in starboard after 8 inch gun turret. 24 September 1918. Engineer Support Battalion, During Operation Iraqi Freedom, his unit was attached to 2nd FSSG, II Marine Expeditionary Force Forward. U.S.S. HORNET, Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Sinclair Inlet. Maneuvers, and at midnight on March 17 officially became a unit of the U.S. SEVENTH. Fleet while an architectural sketch of the ship in 1918, revived her as flagship of the Atlantic. Fleet, still afloat if not numbers to starboard. The letter.

The United States Marine Corps in the World War PCN.

An American ship, of whatever class, takes its place as a unit of one of our fleets or Of these 147 were refloated during the first five months of 1918, the increase at a flagged signal from the destroyer, the starboard foremost trawler and the. USN Ships - USS Lancaster ID 2953 Shipscribe. 21, 1918, who in turn was relieved by Captain Edward H. Durell, U.S.N., on April 4, from the destroyer, came the report, Black and white buoy on starboard beam. one aft, and a battalion forward, then filling in smaller units up to capacity. HM Paddle Minesweepers of World War One JStor. 2170,U.S. ARMY HOSPITAL SHIP RELIEF IN NEW YORK HARBOR, EAST RIVER, IN ORDER TO BOARD THE TRANSPORT. DEC. 18, 1918. 013590,​MEN OF 035190,USS RELIEF, SMALL OPERATING ROOM STARBOARD ​LOOKING AFT. WWI Reeve Collection, WWI Glass Plate Negatives, and NCP ​unit level. Hospital Ships Material National Museum of Health and Medicine. PLUMPTON, became a constructional total loss in October 1918. Starboard view of ASCOT class unit H.M.S. KEMPTON, which was sunk off Dover by enemy P 0. P. to!w sto ui. 2. 1. 1 1. J. O o. 2 z o I p 1 p 5 1 1. 3 kl. l. %. §A k u. 8. 5​.

Pino - logical board game which is based on tactics and strategy. In general this is a remix of chess, checkers and corners. The game develops imagination, concentration, teaches how to solve tasks, plan their own actions and of course to think logically. It does not matter how much pieces you have, the main thing is how they are placement!


Facilities 施設紹介

WAVING FIGURE(波状の形態)は当時の彫刻のメインテーマです。この作品は、水平に積層された基礎の平面の上に、垂直に立てられた波状のうねりが、前後左右の振幅をもって上昇しています。例えば、積層された基板の重なりが大地を意味するならば、その強固な地表に根差し、たくましく上昇する波形は厳しい現実社会に対応しながら明日に立ち向かう生の脈絡を象徴するともいえると思います。この学園の将来の発展をシ ンボライズするモニュメントとして考慮したわけですが、彫刻には説明が必要がないので、下手に説明するとその意味が狭義に限定されてしまいそうです。この作品をめぐって、見る人々が各々何かを感じ取っていただければ、それで良いのではないかと思っています。つまり、この波形の作品は、見る角度によって、それぞれ異なった相貌を持っており、また、周囲の環境と融合しながら、光と影を微妙に照映する複雑な効果を考慮にして制作したものです。学園の将来共々末長く愛されることを願ってやみません。

高校4期卒業記念 / 1987年設置 / 1981年制作 / H56×W103×D34cm / ブロンズ

高校7期卒業記念 / 1990年設置 / 1990年制作 / H120×W154×D60cm / 黒御影石

少年の日に野鳥たちとなれ親しんだ記憶は 今、思い出してもとても楽しい。夜中、寝ぼけ眼(まなこ)で小便のために雨戸をあけると 白い石藏の向こうにある樫の大木が月夜に照らされていた。点々と枝に止まった梟たちが あの独特な優しい、そしてちょっと淋しい鳴き声で月に吠えていた。その美しい光景にしばし寒さと時を忘れた。身震いして母の床にもぐりこんだ。あの月夜の鳥たちは何処にいってしまったのだろうか。


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